Alonso makes magic

Epic comeback for the Spaniard, who passed six cars at the start and finished seventh in the Silverstone sprint race. Verstappen beat Hamilton.

Alonso-makes-magic

Ahead, it was a gunmen's duel and the one who drew the fastest won, as always happens in the West. Verstappen was smart, he kept Hamilton waiting on the grid for that extra couple of seconds that would help cool down his tires. The brakes of the Red Bull were smoking under the traffic lights, in fact some flame peeked from the insides of the tire. But the qualifying race that had generated so much expectation at Silverstone started and the Dutchman flew, after a few meters he had already surpassed the Mercedes. They paired for half a lap, it was exciting, but Sir Lewis was already on a different footing. From there, one to manage and think about how to win this Sunday and the other, to lament. Bottas, who came out with the softest Pirelli to attack, didn't even look out. Because it's not that easy.

When the opening act ended, Fernando Alonso picked up the baton and justified the invention of the 'F1 Sprint', the return of fans to the circuits and their return to the World Championship in seventeen laps of pure magic based on an exit that should not surprise, because already I had done them before. He started eleventh with the red tire and the knife between his teeth, passing Sainz on the same straight using the traction of his tires, then Vettel on the first turn and Russell on the fast laced. When the strongest braking came he paired with Ricciardo and Checo, they were the most risky movements. Norris was passed outside in Copse. Six cars, six, in just half a lap.

In the first passage through the finish line, the two-time Spanish champion was fifth behind the leaders and Leclerc's Ferrari, which raced in no man's land. The soft wheels bet was risky because it meant going out with better performance than anyone else and ending degradation through the roof. Therefore, the height of the maneuvers to progress were the defenses. He did everything that the Oviedo man could and gave a lesson on how to resist with a slower car when pressed by a McLaren. Norris overtook him after several attempts, and Ricciardo also won the position with more effort than his British partner.But next in line was Vettel, an old enemy in the days of Red Bull and Ferrari. Seb tried it in a number of ways, stuck in the wake of the Alpine and snaked around with an Aston Martin that has more top speed (Mercedes engine) on harder tires. Three laps from the end he was a constant threat, but the Spaniard did not open a single door and crowned a show at the height of his best performances in this sport. Even if it was to start seventh on the grid on Sunday, with no points at stake, for the mere pleasure of lifting 140,000 fans from their seats and offsetting the price of any ticket and the hours under the British sunshine. Just for these laps, the return was worth it.Sainz: Russell touch and comeback

It was not a good day for Checo Pérez, who lost the Red Bull when he was chasing Lando and crashed, will start last in the British GP. Neither for Carlos Sainz, because it was Russell's turn at the start and he fell to the last position. He went back nine places and was eleventh, from that position he will start in the race that does distribute points. But he aspired to something else in a hectic sprint that suited him like a glove, because the short qualifying race reveals which riders on this grid stand out in an agonizing and frenetic sprint. "The sprint race was Alonso," summed up one of those authorized voices from the paddock that drags more races than most riders. And veterans are often right.



Photos from as.com
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