Rahm, at the gates of El Dorado

The Basque leaves this Friday (20:20) in the PGA final. He has a huge loot at hand: the tournament, the circuit, number one and 15 million dollars.

Rahm-at-the-gates-of-El-Dorado

Even in a stormy year, the PGA ship reaches port. The pandemic sprint of the circuit culminates with the Tour Championship (from 8:00 p.m. at Movistar Golf), which starts this Friday at the East Lake Golf Course. There have been eleven tournaments in just over two months, since the activity resumed with the Travelers Championship on June 25 until reaching the final event in Georgia (USA), in which about thirty players will compete, the most regular it's from the season. A kind of golf G30. Flower and cream.

Among them will be Jon Rahm, abuzz after a memorable victory in the BMW Championship last week. The Biscayan, who before disembarking in Atlanta dropped by New York to take Winged Foot's pulse for the US Open (from 17 to 20 this month), is at the gates of El Dorado, one step away from the great loot: a second successive win would make him champion of the circuit, something that no Spaniard has yet achieved, and could return him to first place in the world rankings depending on what Dustin Johnson, his match mate, does in the first two laps (in the first will leave at 20:20 Spanish). There is also the bag, 60 million dollars in prizes, 15 (about 12.7 euros) for the winner.

"With that money even my great-grandchildren could pay for college," says Rahmbo. An obscene amount in times of crisis? "The PGA Tour does an immense job with the platform it has to help different communities across the country. We play more than 40 weeks a year and each tournament we help one. So no, I don't feel guilty. donated a lot of money to in these four years on the tour, for example to survivors of natural disasters, sometimes, or others to different people who needed help ", third. "I think we're all here to try to be the best," he adds.

He will have it easier than others from the start. With the change of format made last year, participants start with a certain number of strokes ahead (see table) depending on their position in the FedExCup ranking after the BMW. Thus, Rahm will come out at -8. From 11th to 15th they will start at -3; from 15th to 20th, at -2; from 21st to 25th, at -1, and the last five at par. Income is important, but not final. There are four days ahead and behind him will be loaded with consummate champions on the circuit such as Justin Thomas, Hideki Matsuyama, Bryson DeChambeau and Webb Simpson. Also young values like Collin Morikawa, Daniel Berger or Viktor Hovland.

Without Tiger and Mickelson

Tiger Woods, out of shape after the break due to the health crisis, did not get a place in the BMW. He will miss the final for the second year in a row after winning it in 2018, amid the rebuilding process that culminated in last year's Augusta Masters. Nor will Phil Mickelson appear, who at 50 has already begun the transition to the veteran circuit. The simultaneous absence of two of the figures that have marked this circus in the 21st century does not go unnoticed, but it also does not detract from a season that ends on Monday even though the US Open and the Masters are yet to be played, which will appear on the calendar of the next season. After all, nothing is normal in 2020.



Photos from as.com
Powered by Blogger.